ENDOMETRIOSIS

What is endometriosis?

Endometriosis occurs when tissue similar to the inner lining of the uterus, also known as the endometrium, is found outside its normal location, where the tissue should not be. This may result in inflammation, as the tissue even outside the uterus will respond to the monthly fluctuations of the menstrual cycle.

The disease affects 1 in 10 reproductive-aged individuals (aged 12-52) – an estimated 200 million women worldwide – and many often experience a decade-long delay in diagnosis. Currently, there is no known exact cause of endometriosis.

Where can endometriosis be found?

Generally, endometriosis is found in the pelvic cavity. It can attach to any of the female reproductive organs including, but not limited to, the outside of the uterus, fallopian tubes, ovaries, uterosacral ligaments, peritoneum, and any of the spaces between the bladder, uterus, and vagina. Endometriosis can also involve other areas including the large and small bowel, appendix, diaphragm, lungs, and rectum.

Who is affected by endometriosis?

Endometriosis affects people mostly in their reproductive years and can even affect adolescents who have just started to have their periods.

The disease can impact all aspects of life—school, career, finances, relationships, and overall well-being. The symptoms may be so severe that individuals miss out on school, work, sports, or social events. There are laparoscopic treatment options for related pain and infertility.

Several factors are considered when determining the best treatment for endometriosis symptoms, including:

  • Age
  • Severity of symptoms
  • Duration of disease
  • Fertility

Not all treatments work well for all women with endometriosis. Also, endometriosis symptoms may return after the treatment is stopped or, in the case of surgery, as more time passes after the procedure.

Treatment options in endometriosis

  • Hormone therapy
  • Pain medications
  • Laparoscopy

Laparoscopy remains Gold standard in diagnosis and treatment of Endometriosis in women of all ages.